SadhanaVedanta
November 30, 2018

BE SILENT

BE SILENT - The Truth Is by Sri H. W. L. Poonja (Papaji) The purpose of all practice is Silence, your real nature. Without Silence you cannot be in peace so strive only for this. Even while active remain in Silence as Silence and be conscious of Silence always. Ramana’s main teaching is Silence and it is this Silence that silently answers all questions and removes all doubts. Train your mind to go to Silence. As Kabir said: “Keep your body, your mind, your intellect, and your prana quiet and wisdom will follow behind you searching for you!” Be Silent by…
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Vedanta
November 16, 2018

KUNDALINI SHAKTI’S INVOLUTION AND EVOLUTION

KUNDALĪ SHAKTI’S INVOLUTION AND EVOLUTION - The Serpent Power by Arthur Avalon Shakti as Prakriti first evolves mind (Buddhi, Ahamkara, Manas) and senses (Indriya), and then sensible matter (Bhūta) of fivefold form (“ether,” “air,” “ fire,” “water,” “earth”) derived from the supersensible generals of the sense-particulars called Tanmātra. When Shakti has entered the last and grossest Tattva (“earth”) - that is, solid matter - there is nothing further for Her to do. Her creative activity then ceases, and She rests. She rests in Her last emanation, the “earth” principle. She is again coiled and sleeps. She is now Kundalī Shakti,…
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VedantaVishnu
July 9, 2018

Yoga-Vāsiṣṭha: On the Spiritual Heart

When Rama asked, "Which is the greatest mirror in which we see these images of things? What is it that is called the Heart of all the beings in the world?" Vasistha answered, "When we reflect we see that all the beings in the world have two hearts."   "One of these is worth acceptance, the other is not useful (spiritually). Listen how they differ. The organ called the heart placed somewhere in the chest of the physical body is useless. The Heart which is of the form of Pure Awareness is worth acceptance; it is both within and without…
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Adwaita
June 10, 2018

Paṃcadaśī: manual of Adwaita Vedanta

Panchadasi (पंचदशी) is a classic manual of Adwaita Vedanta composed in the 14th century by Vidyaranya Swami, who was the head of the Sringeri Mutt and was also instrumental in establishing the Vijaynagara Empire. Vidyaranya's pre-monastic name was Madhavacharya (not to be confused with the founder of the Dvaita sampradaya). He also composed a famous compendium of all Indian spiritual schools known as Sarvadarśanasaṅgraha where he lists all possible philosophies prevalent in India at that time. Another of his famous works is Madhaviya Shankaravijaya, a biography of Adi Shankaracharya. Panchdasi as the name suggests consists of 15 chapters grouped into…
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Vedanta
June 10, 2018

Turiya in Māṇḍūkya Upanisad

nāntaḥ-prajñam, na bahiṣ prajñam, nobhayataḥ-prajñam na prajnañā-ghanam, na prajñam, nāprajñam; adṛṣtam, avyavahārayam, agrāhyam, alakṣaṇam, acintyam, avyapadeśyam, ekātma-pratyaya-sāram, prapañcopaśamam, śāntam, śivam, advaitam, caturtham manyante, sa ātmā, sa vijñeyaḥ. - Māṇḍūkya Upaniṣad. One of the standard ways in which Upanishads speak of the supreme reality is by means of telling us what it is not. For example in the above verse on Turiya, starts with nāntaḥ-prajñam (not inwardly cognitive), referring to the state of dreams equivalent to the condition of the subtle body. The powers of the mind that we use for functioning like seeing, hearing, speaking are in the realm of…
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Vedanta
June 5, 2018

Avadhūta: His Nature, His Freedom

The Avadhūta Upanishad is a part of the Krshna Yujurveda which describes the nature of an Avadhūta in the course of a conversation between Sankriti and Bhagavan Dattātreya, the first among Avadhūtas. Sankriti asks: "Who is an Avadhūta, what is his state? What are his characteristics? How does he move about in the world" The supreme compassionate Lord Dattātreya replied thus: "The Avadhuta is so called because he is the immutable akshara; he is the most worthy of worship (varenya), he has shaked off all wordly bondages (dhuta-samsara-bandhana); and he is the implied meaning of tatwamasi, hence tattvamasyadi laksya. He who…
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Vedanta
April 21, 2018

Kenopanishat

The Kenopaniṣat says - आत्मना विन्दतॆ वीर्यं विद्यया विन्दतॆऽमृतम् - AtmanA vindatE vIryaM; vidyayA vindatE amRutam meaning, from the Atmah comes Power and Strength, from Knowledge comes Immortality. The Kena is a Mukhya Upanishad embedded in the end of the Samaveda. It deals with discussion of the Brahman which is both with and without any attributes and explains that the various gods, symbolized as forces of nature, both internal and external, has the Brahman as their ultimate and efficient cause. The word kena is a question that the Upanishat asks repeatedly as a means of self inquiring into the root…
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